oppn parties RBI, Monetary Policy & Inflation

News Snippets

  • EMI's set to rise after the RBI hikes key policy rate
  • Calcutta HC says that the right to privacy does not end with the death of a person
  • Supreme Court says that a delayed order of preventive detention makes it invalid
  • Shashi Tharoor posts an erronous map of India in his manifesto, rectifies the error after criticism
  • Sonia Gandhi to take a call on who will be Rajasthan chief minister
  • Mallikarujun Kharge to be the new candidate to oppose Shashi Tharoor in the Congress presidential elections
  • RBI says that the September inflation rate may be higher than 7%
  • RBI hikes key rates by 50bps, downwardly revises FY23 growth rate to 7% from 7.2% earlier
  • Stocks recover well on Friday: Sensex gains 1016 points to0 57426 and Nifty 276 points to 17094
  • Mirabai Chanu wins gold easily at the National Games
  • In a first, the Supreme Court recognizes marital rape, although for the limited purpose of allowing married women the right of abortion up to 24 weeks if they conceived as a result of forced sex by their husbands
  • Air India cuts discounts on base fare to students and senior citizens from 50% to 25%
  • Mallikarjun Kharge and Digvijay Singh are being touted as frontrunners to take on Shashi Tharoor in the elections for the post of Congress president
  • Sonia Gandhi will decide who will be Rajasthan CM if she feels there is a need to change guard after the near-rebellion by MLAs in the state
  • Ashok Gehlot bowed out of the race for being Congress president after meeting Sonia Gandhi
RBI hikes key rates by 50bps, stocks jump and recover 50% of the losses incurred in the last few session
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RBI, Monetary Policy & Inflation

By Sunil Garodia
First publised on 2015-09-25 11:23:00

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator.
In its latest policy review, the RBI expectedly maintained status quo and left key lending rates unchanged. It was expected because of two main reasons: retail inflation shot to a nine-month high in June and although the RBI has cut repo rates ( rates at which it provides short term funds to banks) by 75 basis points since January this year, the banks have passed on only 30 basis points to the end consumer. The RBI was clear in saying that further rate reduction depends on how inflation pans out and how commercial banks pass on rate reduction to consumers.

But as a belligerent government wishes to bring down interest rates despite inflationary pressure, there is little the RBI would be able to do in future if the latest revised financial code put up by the finance ministry is anything to go by. The code seeks to take away the veto power the RBI governor has in matters of setting lending rates. Even before this policy review, there were indications from the ministry that the time was ripe for another rate cut.

Although the RBI governor Raghuram Rajan has been quoted as saying that he isn’t opposed to the idea of taking away of the veto power, this clearly goes against the recommendation of the Financial Sector Legislative Reforms Commission (FSLRC), which had advised for the same “in exceptional circumstances.” It is also incongruous to have a body that is saddled with containing inflation but whose chief does not have a say in the amount of money that is to float in the economy.

Rajan pointed out that a committee formed to take monetary policy decisions would bring in different view-points, will reduce the pressure on one individual and would ensure continuity (as it would be reconstituted even if one member exits). But one is certain that the RBI has internal committees to take these decisions. The point is that if the RBI governor feels that inflation would be jacked up if rates are reduced or more money is injected in the economy at a particular point of time, he should have the right to refuse taking such a decision. If not, he should not be responsible for containing inflation.