oppn parties Monetary Policy, Cost Of Funds And Growth

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  • T20 WC: USA enter Super Eights as their last match against Ireland gets washed out. They were ahead of Pakistan in the points tally. Pakistan were eliminated
  • T20 WC: USA enter Super Eights as their last match against Ireland gets washed out. They were ahead of Pakistan in the points tally. Pakistan were eliminated
  • BJD leader and former Odisha CM Naveen Patnaik said that the criticism of his aide V K Pandian is "regrettable"
  • As more than 20 BJP ministers lost in the recent elections, the new Union cabinet will have many new faces from the party
  • Congress Working committee asks Rahul Gandhi to take up the position of Leader of Opposition in Lok Sabha. Gandhi says he will consider the request
  • RBI governor Shaktikanta Das said that gold was shifted to India as the quantum of RBI gold abroad had increased due to recent purchases
  • Delhi HC rules that submitting photographic evidence of adultery will not be enough, they will have to be proved as authentic in the age of deepfakes
  • A four-member panel will review NEET-UG results of 1563 candidates to check if they were given extra marks for exam time loss
  • Mamata Banerjee says her party will not join Modi's oath-taking ceremony. Also says INDIA bloc might stake claim to form government later
  • K C Tyagi of the JD(U) dropped a bombshell when he said that Nitish Kumar was offered the post of prime minister for switching sides. Opposition leaders rubbished the claim
  • This May was India's hottest month in 36 years says IMD
  • T20 WC: India take on Pakistan today. Telecast to begin at 8pm IST
  • T20 WC: Afghanistan stun New Zealand and Bangladesh win against Sri Lanka
  • T20 World Cup: Australia beat England by 36 runs. This spoils England's chances of making the playoffs as they have lost both their matches till now
  • Heat wave continues in the country as monsoon moves slow
G7 commits to promote India-Europe corridor
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Monetary Policy, Cost Of Funds And Growth

By Sunil Garodia
First publised on 2020-02-13 12:38:10

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator.

In its February bi-monthly meeting, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) of the RBI decided to hold rates while maintaining an "accommodative stance". This was expected as inflation had climbed way above the 4% considered 'normal' by the MPC. Despite regular rate cuts for the last few quarters, growth has refused to pick up. Neither has relatively cheaper credit led to an increased demand for funds. Although the banks have not fully passed on the rate cuts to consumers, the demand for funds is not only dependant on cheap or cheaper funds. There is stagnancy in demand for goods and services in the economy and unless that picks up, entrepreneurs will not plan to invest in new projects or increase the capacity of existing ones. The RBI's decision not to further reduce the repo rate in this meeting was vindicated in a couple of days when it was reported that retail inflation had shot up further to stand at 7.59% in January, the highest since May 2014.

But since spurring growth is a prime concern now, the RBI has unleashed other weapons in its armoury to relieve the banks by making the cost of finance cheaper for them on the one hand and provide them with liquidity so that they can lend more, on the other. Banks have been exempted from providing for cash reserve ratio (CRR) on fresh retail loans disbursed after January 31 to purchase vehicles and homes, and to MSMEs. While this will make the cost of funds cheaper for banks and will channel funds in segments that can spur demand, unbridled and seemingly lucrative (for banks) retail loans can well assume the dimensions of a bubble. Banks have to guard against this.

Then, the RBI has introduced one- and- three-year term repos for a total amount of Rs 1 lakh crore through which the banks can borrow funds from the RBI at the existing repo rate of 5.15%. This will also reduce the cost of finance for banks as they now borrow at a rate between 6-6.5%. While this will make banks secure, it remains to be seen how much of the rate differential they pass on to the consumer. The RBI move had an immediate effect in lowering interest rates in the bond market which went down by 10 to 15 basis points in a matter of minutes after the announcement.

But the problem being faced by the economy is not going to be addressed only by making credit cheaper or infusing liquidity in the system. By all accounts, banks are already flush with funds. Lending is not taking off because there is either no demand or the banks are not interested to lend to the few who do need money. This is either because the projects do not inspire confidence or the bankers have still not got over the fear factor despite changes in the rules and prodding by the finance minister. Retail loans are also not growing at the expected rate because businessmen-borrowers do not want to extend themselves in the face of falling profits in their own businesses and the salaried class is worried about job cuts, delayed or no raises and smaller bonuses. Despite all the right boxes being ticked by both the government and the RBI, things will change only when the sentiment improves. The scary part is that no one knows how and when will that happen.